An Evening with Long Litt Woon

Long Litt Woon
Long Litt Woon, photo by Johs Bøh
The New York Mycological Society is pleased to present an evening with Long Litt Woon. Long will discuss and read from her recently published memoir, The Way Through the Woods on Mushrooms and Mourning.

When:
Monday, August 12th 6:00 – 8:00

Where:
Central Park Arsenal 830 5th Ave. (at 64th St.) New York, NY 10065

Copies of the books will be available for purchase and signing

Long Litt Woon (born 1958 in Malaysia) is an Anthropologist and certified Mushroom Expert in Norway. She went to Norway in her youth as an exchange student. There she met and later married a Norwegian, Eiolf Olsen, and made Norway her home. She currently lives in Oslo, Norway. The author’s surname is Long in accordance to Chinese naming tradition.

To listen to an interview with Long Litt Woon, click here.

To read an excerpt from The Way Through the Woods, click here.

Spring 2019

Greg Thorn and Cyphelloid Fungi by Leah Krauss
Indian Style Curried Lactarius in Coconut Milk by Dennis Aita
Thai Curry Lactarius in Coconut Milk by Juniper Perlis
Stepping Up Your Mushroom Game: 10 Surprising Ways iNaturalist Can Help by Sigrid Jakob
Who’s in a Name? by John Dawson
Appalachian Fungi: A Field Guide by Walter E. Sturgeon review by Tom Bigelow
Mycommentary by Ethan Crenson
Notes from the 2019 Business Meeting

EMIL LANG LECTURE SERIES FOR 2019

The NYMS Emil Lang Lectures for 2019 will be held on Monday nights, from 6:00-8:00, at the Central Park Arsenal. The entrance is just off 5th Ave. at 64th St.

The Arsenal, Central Park
830 5th Ave., Rm 318 (@ 64th St.)
New York, NY 10065

The lectures are free and open to the public.

Else-with-amanitas-by-Nhu-Nguyen

February 25th
Else Vellinga
“Fungal Conservation”

Else Vellinga is a mycologist who is interested in naming and classifying mushroom species in California and beyond, especially Parasol mushrooms. She has described 22 species as new for California, and most recently worked at the herbaria at University of California at Berkeley and San Francisco State University for the Macrofungi and Microfungi Collections Digitization projects. She got her training at the National Herbarium in the Netherlands, and her PhD at the University of Leiden, also in the Netherlands. The main motivation for her taxonomic work is that it lays the basis for efforts to include mushroom species in nature management and conservation plans. She has proposed a number of Californian and Hawaiian species for the IUCN global database of endangered species. She tries to keep current with the mushroom literature. And lastly, Else is an avid knitter and likes to use mushroom dyed yarn for her creations. She lives with her two cats in Berkeley, California.

Greg Thorn

March 25th
Greg Thorn
“Explorations of Cyphelloid Fungi (and other Wee Mushrooms) in the Molecular Age”

Greg Thorn grew up in London, Ontario and became interested in natural history through the family garden, long summer vacations, and the local Field Naturalists group. Six summers as a naturalist in Algonquin Park built on this and introduced him to the world of mushrooms and other fungi. Mushroom forays of the Mycological Society of Toronto and NAMA were an important part of his training, where he met and learned from the likes of Gary Lincoff, Ron Petersen, Alex Smith, and many more. Writing the checklist of Algonquin Park macrofungi led Thorn to consult experts from Richard Korf to Jim Ginns and Scott Redhead, all of whom encouraged him to further studies of fungi. His graduate studies were at the University of Guelph (with George Barron) and the University of Toronto (with David Malloch), followed by positions in Japan, Michigan, Indiana, Wyoming, and finally back to London as a faculty member in the Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario. Thorn’s research is focused on the impact of disturbance on the diversity of mushroom fungi, and systematics of mushroom fungi generally.

Rod Tulloss

April 29th
Rod Tulloss
“Amanita with a Hand Lens and the Naked Eye: Communicating About Unfamiliar Finds Using the Seven Sections Recognized by Dr. Cornelis Bas”

Rod Tulloss has specialized in Amanitaceae for 42 years, having been mentored by the late Dr. Cornelis Bas (Leiden). His research is available through an expanding, open-access, on-line monograph, “Studies in the Amanitaceae” founded by him and co-edited with Dr. Zhu L. Yang (Kunming). The site treats over 1,050 taxa and includes a peer-reviewed e-journal (“Amanitaceae”) restricted to research associated with the herbarium and/or its staff. He is currently working on Amanita sect. Vaginatae for North America; the Boston Harbor Islands fungal inventory; providing support for individuals and clubs working on Amanita sequences via North American Mycoflora grants; providing interactions and teaching moments on mushroomobserver.org and on the Amanita of North America facebook group, etc. He maintains an extensive private herbarium of world Amanitaceae.

Visit his website: http://www.amanitaceae.org/

May 20th
Nova Patch
“Urban Lichens of New York City”

Nova Patch is an amateur lichenologist focusing on the urban lichens of NYC and curator of the open data project Lichens of New York City on iNaturalist. They are a regular speaker on diverse topics ranging from lichenology to emoji engineering, hold a botany certificate from the New York Botanical Garden, and are a Brooklyn-residing member of the New York Mycological Society. Nova will lead a city lichen walk the weekend following their talk.

Eagle Hill Announces 2019 Mycology Workshops

eagle-hill

May 19 – 25
Lichens and Lichens Ecology
Troy McMullin

May 26 – June 1
Old-growth Forest Lichens and Allied Fungi, With a Focus on Calicioids
Steven Selva and Troy McMullin

May 26 – Jun 1
Introduction to Bryophytes and Lichens
Fred Olday

June 16 – 22
Independent Study: Topics in Fungal Biology
Donald Pfister

July 28 – August 3
Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles:
Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms
Greg Marley and Michaeline Mulvey

Aug 11 – 17
Crustose Lichens, Accessory Fungi, and Symbiotic Transitions
Toby Spribille

Aug 11 – 17
Lichens, Biofilms, and Stone
Judy Jacob and Michaela Schmull

August 18 – 24
Mushroom Microscopy: An Exploration of the
Intricate Microscopic World of Mushrooms
David Porter and Michaeline Mulvey

September 27 – 29
Fall Maine Mushrooms
David Porter and Michaeline Mulvey

For a flyer that has links to individual mycology seminar info:
click here

For general information…

https://www.eaglehill.us/programs/nhs/nhs-calendar.shtml

office@eaglehill.us

Winter 2019

Microbia: A Journey into the Unseen World Around You by Eugenia Bone reviewed by Mical Moser
How to Change Your Mind by Michael Pollan reviewed by Leah Krauss
Green-Wood Cemetery: A Place for the Dead That Teems with Life by Sigrid Jakob
The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins reviewed by William May
The Mushroom Fan Club by Elise Gravel reviewed by Mac Crenson
Mushrooms: A Natural and Cultural History by Nicholas P. Money reviewed by Matt Gardner
Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation by Tradd Cotter reviewed by Craig Trester

Summer-Fall 2018

This newsletter is dedicated to our beloved friend and mentor, Gary Lincoff.

Contributors: Dennis Aita, Alissa Allen, Raymond Archambault & Kit Hang Leung, Alice Barner, Tom Bigelow, Eugenia Bone, Kathy and Joe Brandt, Cornelia Cho, Jason Cortland, Ralph Cox, Ethan Crenson, Jean-Pierre Delwasse, Bill Eggers, Ginette Francis, Matt Gardner, Tim Graham, Jeff Hodges, Susan Hopkins, Hiromi Karagiannis, Richard Kauffman, Reema Keswani, Sharon Kitagawa and Ira Hainick, Deborah Klein, Pam Kray, Jim Kronick, Carin Kuoni, Sam Landes, Maryna Lansky, David Lewis, Roz Lowen, Claude Martz, Mark Michleski & Kumiko Itagaki, Lawrence Millman, Mical Moser, Danny Newman, Anna Oakes, Elias Oakes, John Oakes, Nathaniel Oakes, Louise Oppedahl, John Plischke III, Michael Rapp, Don Recklies, Bruch Reed, Maria Reidelbach, Sarah-David Rosenbaum, Pam Sabroso, Paul Sadowski, Talia Schenkel, Elinoar Shavit, Noah Siegel, Dianna Smith, Dorothy Smullen, Walt Sturgeon, Kay Spurlock, Vivien Tartter, Thomas J. Volk, Nancy Ward, Sue Watson, Victor Weiss, Patricia Welles, Thaddeus Wolfe, Jacquelyn S Wong, Michael Wood, Gene Yetter, Bill Yule, Maria Zeremski

Spring 2018

Gary Lincoff by Ethan Crenson
NYMS DNA Barcoding Kit by Craig Trester
Roy Halling Lecture – The North-South Connection by Paul Sadowski
Blotches, Spots, and Bumps on Logs by Vivien Tartter
Excerpt from “Microbia: A Journey Into the Unseen World Around You” by Eugenia Bone
NYMS 2018 Business Meeting Minutes

Gary Lincoff (1942-2018)

Many thanks to Britt Bunyard, Publisher of FUNGI Magazine, for this beautiful tribute.

The mycological community was heartbroken on March 16, 2018 to learn of Gary Lincoff’s passing. He was the greatest mycologist of my lifetime, a great friend, and a great person. Gary was an American treasure. He was larger than life. Mycophiles and fans, upon seeing him for the first time in person, were nervous to approach—he was so famous. But he was the most welcoming, the most friendly, the most giving person I knew. That any of us knew. He gave absolutely all of his time to educating others. Every person in the mycological community in North America, and beyond, knew him. If you invoke the name “Gary,” everyone knows of whom you’re speaking.
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New York Botanical Garden Mushroom Programs

The New York Botanical Garden has been a mycological presence in New York City since its founding in the 1800s. It has been the workplace of the mycologists Lucien Underwood, Howard Bigelow, Clark Rogerson, Harry Thiers, Samuel Ristich, Roy Halling, Barbara Thiers and Gary Lincoff.
NYBG presents programs every year in mycological studies. Here are the upcoming events for the Spring & Summer 2018.

THE HIDDEN WORLD OF LICHENS

Instructor: James Lendemer

Rock pimples, fog fingers, old man’s beard— their common names are amusing, but lichens are among Earth’s most amazing and oldest living things, and display incredibly beautiful colors and shapes. They grow on bark, rock, and barren soil, and thrive in rain forests, deserts, the arctic—even environments simulating Mars! Lichens are sensitive environmental indicators, yet scientists are only just beginning to understand them. Join noted NYBG lichenologist James Lendemer for a captivating session that includes a microscope lab and a lichen hunt on the Garden grounds. Dress for the weather.

Tuesday, February 27, 2018, from 10:00am to 01:00pm, at the NYBG location

 

MUSHROOM PAPERMAKING

Instructor: Dorothy Smullen

Use bracket fungi to create beautiful, earth-toned sheets of paper under the expert guidance of mycologist Dorothy Smullen. This hands-on class will walk you step-by-step through the papermaking process, and introduce you to the many different mushrooms you can use for a variety of hues. Your friends will be Instagramming your thank you cards in no time.

Saturday, April 7, 2018, from 11:00am to 02:30am, at the NYBG location

SPRING MUSHROOMS

Instructor: Paul Sadowski

Morels, though hard to spot, occur throughout the metropolitan region, and spring is the ideal time to find them. Discover how and where to hunt for them, as well as numerous other spring mushrooms including oysters, inky caps, wine caps, dryad’s saddle, reishi, and the early-spring chicken mushroom. Learn to correctly identify mushrooms, how to differentiate them from look-alikes, and get recipes for the best ways to prepare them in a meal.

Wednesdays, 05/23/18 & 05/30/18 10:00am – 01:00pm, Midtown Center, Room A

 

MUSHROOMS & MYCORRHIZAE

Instructor: Roy Halling, Ph.D.

Join Dr. Roy Halling, NYBG’s Curator of Mycology, on an insider’s tour of the Thain Family Forest. A widely published expert on mushrooms around the world (and featured on the podcast Radio Lab!), Dr. Halling will discuss how mushrooms contribute to a forest’s health, delving into the process by which mycorrhizal roots share water and nutrients with their tree partners in exchange for carbohydrates. You’ll gather a variety of mushrooms to dissect and observe under microscopes, using stains to distinguish between plant and fungal material.

Friday, August 10, 2018, from 10:00am to 01:00pm, at the NYBG location

EMIL LANG LECTURE SERIES FOR 2018

Lectures will be held on Monday nights, from 6:00-8:00, at the Central Park Arsenal. The entrance is just off 5th Ave. at 64th St.
The Arsenal, Central Park
830 5th Ave., Rm 318 (@ 64th St.)
New York, NY 10065

February 26th

Ethan Crenson

“Blotches, Spots, and Bumps on Logs: Getting Small To Find Unknown Fungal Treasures Staring Us In the Face”

Ethan Crenson received an MFA in photography from the School of Visual Arts in NYC in the 1990s. He runs two companies, a graphic design company and a gallery/publishing house for artists’ multiples. He became interested in fungi around 10 years ago and joined the New York Mycological Society shortly thereafter. He is an active contributor to the five borough fungal survey, Gary Lincoff’s effort to inventory the fungal inhabitants of NYC. He became interested in very small fungi about three years ago.

March 19th

Roy Halling

“Mushrooms of Costa Rica: An Overview”

Roy Halling received a masters degree in 1976 at San Francisco State University with a thesis on the Boletaceae of the Sierra Nevada. He earned a docterate degree from University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 1980. He then held a two-year postdoctoral position at Harvard University at the Farlow Herbarium. In 1983 he accepted the position of assistant curator of mycology at the New York Botanical Garden, where he currently holds the position of research mycologist and curator of mycology. While in New York, he began to focus on the macrofungi of South America. He obtained a National Science Foundation grant to do a survey of the Collybia in South America. This survey began a fifteen-year collaboration with Dr. Greg Mueller to document to macrofungi of the oak forests in Costa Rica. He continues his work in Costa Rica and is actively involved in international collaboration with other specialists on the systematics, biogeography, and phylogeny of boletes, with particular emphasis in Australia and Southeast Asia.

April 23rd

Rachel Swenie

“Mushrooms with Teeth: The History, Diversity, and Edibility of the Mushroom Genus Hydnum

Rachel Swenie is PhD student in Ecology & Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee, where she studies the diversity, evolution, and biogeography of mushroom-forming fungi. She has done mycological field work throughout the southeastern US and in southern South America. Originally from Chicago, Rachel formerly ran an edible mushroom farm where she cultivated a variety of gourmet mushrooms.

May 21st

Richard Jacob

“DNA Barcoding and the Mycoflora Project”

Richard Jacob is a scientist working in the field of proteomics identifying and quantitating peptides and proteins. His work has taken him from his home town of Cambridge in the UK to Germany and the USA. He became very interested in mushrooms when he moved to Pittsburgh and found morels growing in the backyard and joined Western Pennsylvania Mushroom Club so that he could learn how to find more. Recently Richard has used his scientific background to pioneer the clubs DNA barcoding project and he is a member of the NAMA Mycoflora committee. In 2016 Richard was awarded the Harry and Elsie Knighton Service Award by NAMA for his contributions to the WPMC and wider community.